HR and Startups – Planning for Successful Growth and Greater Productivity

Over the years Resourceful HR has had the opportunity to work with many cutting edge startups in both the Bay Area and the Pacific Northwest. It has been a pleasure to help these companies put a plan in place for recruiting, compensation, performance management and compliance. We have had the wonderful opportunity to watch them achieve their growth and productivity goals including hiring top talent and receiving the funding they require to continue to grow.

Accomplishing these initiatives is often easier said than done though, because many entrepreneurs and startup founders have many other responsibilities to focus on. As the Wall Street Journal recently reported, often startups do the bare minimum when it comes to HR because there just isn’t enough time in the day. As the article shares, HR is an important component to add to your bench in order to get most out of your most expensive line item – your people – and to avoid current and future people, performance and policy issues. We encourage you to read the entire article here as several HR consultants and executives share some great tips.

Four important things to remember:

HR is more than recruiting. Often startups are focused on acquiring the talent they need without thinking about the HR structure and initiatives needed to support them after they join your company. Don’t lose sight of the long game.

Your office manager may need HR training or support. Many times HR responsibilities fall to the office manager by default. He/she may need additional HR training or an HR expert that can provide support when it comes to employee, performance, or compliance issues, as well as guidance on which HR activities will bring the greatest return on investment.
Be conscious of the culture you want to create and work towards creating it from the very start. It is much easier to start as you intend to finish rather than find yourself in a situation where you may need to make big culture changes when you’re already well underway.

Assess which policies are required by law and which policies will clarify company expectations and offerings. You may also want to consider policies that are specific to your work environment and/or demographic such as social media, telecommuting, and relocation policies. At this point, it’s probably safe to say that every company should have a social media policy given its ubiquity in our current society.

Be aware of the nepotism. Startups often tap their own networks for hiring, which has its plusses and minuses. While hiring from referrals tends to be less risky, you can end up with a homogeneous and/or cliquish and divided staff.

Additional resources as you grow your startup:

Are you hitting the 20-employee mark?
Employment laws we advise you to embrace
Create structure for successful growth and greater productivity

What are your thoughts? Let's discuss: